Sometimes, I’m tired.

Sometimes, there are days when I don’t want to put on my big girl panties and my Cloak of Advocacy (which, if you must know, is made of the softest velvet and the perfect shade of green to accentuate my eyes)  and go out into the real world and shake my fist respectively and argue productively.

And then a couple of asshats come along, comment on my blog, and remind me that narrow-minded, prejudiced, ludicrous thinking such as theirs is why I will never stop working to make the world a better place for my special needs kid and others like him.

Plus, you know, the whole Cloak of Advocacy thing is pretty cool.

Anyway, earlier this week I wrote a blog post about the Guest Assistance Pass at Disneyland; specifically my opinion on the fact that some wealthy moms are hiring disabled individuals who qualify for this pass as guides in order to bypass the regular lines.

Now, before I proceed, I want to make it known that I take no issue with the fact that people may disagree with my opinions. I don’t personally recommend it, but if it happens, so be it.  I don’t serve Kool Aid around here; you’re all entitled to your own points of view, as long as they align perfectly with mine.

What I do have a problem with is asshats. Plain and simple. If you’re an asshat, you likely won’t be getting a Christmas card from me. Actually, most of you won’t be getting a Christmas card from me, so I’ll have to think of a better punishment for being an asshat. I’ll get back to you on that but I’m pretty sure it will involve some kind of greeting card being withheld.

So back to the Disneyland post. There has been plenty of asshattery going on in the comment section:

“The writer is a paraplegic from Spinal Cord Injury. Yes, REALLY disabled, but perhaps less than those with mental problems. Which doesn’t mean I’m going to let your kid with Autism go first.”

So basically, Asshat #1 is engaging in a pissing contest over who is more disabled: him or my son.

Awesome.

Unfortunately, I’m all out of gold stars sir, so you’re just going to have to make do with this middle finger I’ve been saving for a special occasion.

Then we’ve got Asshat #2 who not only questions the need for Andrew to have an accommodation such as the Guest Assistance Pass, but who also blames me for Andrew’s developmental delays:

“I question his “need” for this accommodation, and yes, I do blame the parent. Who else is to blame for a child that can barely think for themselves?”

Oh, and he also has a solution for me!!!

“Though I think the real solution starts at trying to find an activity that doesn’t involve much walking or talking for a kid who can’t do either, instead of arbitrarily trying to find work arounds to allow them to do such things…why not keep them in their comfort zone?”

Bleeping fabulous sir! Thank you so much! Why didn’t I think of that? Could my son please borrow your shiny keys? And could we trouble you for corner to sit in where he won’t bother anyone?

Luckily, I come equipped with two middle fingers, so there’s plenty to go around.

These comments are just snippets from several different paragraphs written by two readers. TWO. Do you know how many asshats there are in this world? Two too many.

So, even though I don’t always FEEL like it, I will continue to walk around in my big girl panties (not to be confused with granny underwear) and my *insert echo here* Cloak of Advocacy, because I will not stop until the asshats are outnumbered.

Also, I know it would be super helpful if they all came wearing something like this that easily identified them, especially in large crowds.

 

But as a general rule of thumb, asshats are pretty easy to pick out, especially once they open their mouths.

 

Now, who’s with me? There’s plenty of Cloaks of Advocacy to go around.

(you’re on your own with the underwear though).

 

 

 

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17 Replies to “Advocacy and Asshats”

  1. I am so sorry you have had to deal with asshats. 🙁
    I for one loved your post and have a hard time believing that anyone could disagree with the unfairness of it all.

    Don’t let them get you down.

    Dawn

  2. Wow, this has been a tough week all around for us! I feel for you, but I have to say that I am starting to feel that I need to carry Duct Tape in my purse all the time! It would work well with your Cloak of Advocacy, like the Wonder Woman Bracelets!

  3. It’s hard to understand why people go out of their way to be mean. I think (in addition to your Cloak of Advocacy, which you wear with so much panache) you should be bequeathed a Shield of Asshattery. This would be a reflecting kind of shield that would bounce all meany meanness right back on the meany him(or her)self. Hang tough, and try not to let the (asshat) monkeys get you down. (-:

  4. I hope the sweet gratitude you receive from those of us who wouldn’t be coping as well with out your encouragement drowns out the bitter taste of those nasty comments. Keep writing. We’ll keep sticking up for you. (if you want to post their e-mail address, we could flood their mailboxes for you.)

  5. Maybe, just for laughs, this clown should wait in a long Disney line behind a group home for autistic adults with autism… they with no special pass, and he with his condescension. Then he can see whether these people deserve a pass.

  6. You know what gets me is that people who have never walked in your shoes are telling you how to A) Raise your children and B) make comment on what works for your child.
    That makes them asshats. That and the fact that they think they know but really haven’t a clue because everyone reacts differently to different situations.

  7. If you come across more asshats, you can borrow my two middle fingers since yours are already occupied. If your child is never exposed to new experiences, his brain and world will never grow.

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